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Findings – Results – Publications

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Summaries of RCT findings
Summaries of observational findings
List with all DO-HEALTH related (scientific) publications

Summary RCT findings

PRIMARY OUTCOMES

As primary outcomes of the DO-HEALTH trial, we tested the individual and combined benefits of supplemental 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3, 1 g/day of marine omega-3s, and a SHEP on the change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the Short Physical Performance Battery (lower extremity function), the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (cognitive function), and incidence of non vertebral fractures and infections over 3 years.

The evaluation of primary outcomes shows no superior improvement in terms of bone fractures, leg and memory function by the interventions overall. However, the study suggests a reduction in all infections by omega -3s, with significant reductions in acute upper respiratory infections and urinary tract infections by omega -3s among all participants and a significant reduction of any infections among men. Also, vitamin D contributed to a significant reduction in any infections among younger participants age 70 to 74 and a reduction in systolic blood pressure among men.

“Given the high safety and low costs of these supplements as well as the high mortality associated with infections in older adults, these findings are very relevant for the health of the general population,” says Prof. Bischoff-Ferrari. The gender-specific effects of vitamin D on lowering systolic blood pressure also warrant additional research.

Heike Bischoff-Ferrari

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PRE-FRAILTY & FRAILTY

As a secondary outcome of the DO-HEALTH trial, among the subset of participants who were robust at baseline, we tested the individual and combined benefits of supplemental 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3, 1 g/day of marine omega-3s, and a SHEP on the odds of being pre-frail and frail over 3 years of follow up. Robust, generally healthy and active older adults without major comorbidities, may benefit by a combination of high-dose supplemental vitamin D3, marine omega-3s, and SHEP with regard to the risk of becoming pre-frail over 3 years.

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TOTAL & INJURIOUS FALLS

In this fall analysis, we tested the individual and combined benefits of supplemental 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3, 1 g/day of marine omega-3s, and a SHEP on the incidence rate of total falls as a primary fall endpoint and on the incidence rate of injurious falls as a secondary fall endpoint. Falls were recorded prospectively throughout the trial. Among generally healthy, active and vitamin D-replete older adults, supplemental omega-3s may have a modest benefit for fall prevention, whilst daily high-dose vitamin D or a simple home exercise program had no benefit.

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CANCER

In this pre-defined exploratory analysis, we tested the individual and combined benefits of supplemental 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3, 1 g/day of marine omega-3s, and a SHEP on the time-to-development of any verified invasive cancer as the primary outcome. Supplementation with daily high-dose vitamin D3 plus omega-3s, combined with a simple home exercise program showed a cumulative reduction in cancer risk in generally healthy and active, and largely vitamin D replete adults >=70 years. Each of the treatments had a small individual benefit but when all three treatments were combined, the benefits became statistically significant, and the researchers saw an overall reduction in cancer risk by 61%.

“This is the first randomized controlled trial to show that the combination daily vitamin D3, supplemental marine omega-3s, and a simple home exercise program may be effective in the prevention of invasive cancer among generally healthy and active adults aged 70 and older. Our results, although based on multiple comparisons and requiring replication, may prove to be beneficial for reducing the burden of cancer. Future studies should verify the benefit of combined treatments in the prevention of cancer, also extending to longer follow-ups beyond the three-year duration assessed in this trial,”

Heike Bischoff-Ferrari

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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION

We tested the individual and combined benefits of supplemental 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D3, 1 g/day of marine omega-3s, and a SHEP on lipid and CVD biomarkers plasma changes over 3 years, incident hypertension (secondary endpoints) and major cardiovascular events (MACE, exploratory endpoint). Among generally healthy, active, and largely vitamin D replete, older adults, treatment with omega-3, vitamin D3, and/or SHEP had no benefit on MACE prevention. Only omega-3 supplementation changed lipid biomarkers, but with mixed effects.

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Summary observational findings

LIFESTYLE – DIET STUDIES

Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Incidence of Pre-Frailty and Frailty

The Mediterranean diet has been associated with many health benefits. Therefore, we investigated whether the degree of adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with the incidence of frailty in DO-HEALTH participants. The degree of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (the so-called MedDietScore) at the beginning of the study was not associated with being prefrail or frail. However an increase in the MedDietScore by five points over a period of three years was associated with a lower probability of becoming pre-frail and frail.

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Inflammatory Diet Pattern and Cognitive Function

Diet patterns associated with low chronic inflammation may modulate cognitive decline. We investigated an empirical dietary pattern (EDP) associated with inflammation and its association with cognitive changes over 3-years in DO-HEALTH participants. The EDP was characterized by higher intakes of red and organ meat, refined grains, legumes, poultry and white fish, and lower intakes of coffee, tea, ginger, nuts and cheese. Participants with lowest adherence to the EDP increased their MoCA scores 0.7 points over three years whereas those with highest adherence increased their MoCA scores only by 0.2 points. In conclusion, a low inflammatory diet was associated with better cognitive function over time among adults ≥70 years from five European countries. This finding supports the role of diet in the promotion of cognitive health among older adults.

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LIFESTYLE – PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Prevalence of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns

Physical activity (PA) is important for healthy aging and disease prevention whereas sedentary behavior (SB) accelerates health deterioration. Therefore, we examined the prevalence of PA, defined as  ≥150 min/week of moderate and/or ≥75 min/week of vigorous PA, and SB in DO-HEALTH participants. Overall, 62.2% met PA recommendations and overall, 37.1% spent ≥5.5 h/day with SB. Younger participants (70-74 years), men, and those with BMI <25 kg/m2 met PA recommendations more often. Per country, prevalence of meeting PA recommendations were: Austria 74.4%, France 51.0%, Germany 65.6%, Portugal 46.5%, and Switzerland 66.7%. Regarding SB, prevalence did not differ in all subgroups. Being male, younger age, lower MoCA scores, and higher SPPB score were associated with greater odds, whereas higher BMI, more years of education, higher GDS score, and residing in Portugal were associated with lower odds of meeting PA recommendations. High BMI and higher MoCA scores were associated with greater odds of high SB.

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IRON STUDIES

Prevalence and incidence of iron deficiency

Iron deficiency is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we explored the prevalence and incidence of iron deficiency in DO-HEALTH participants. The prevalence of iron deficiency (defined as soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) > 28.1 nmol/L) at the beginning of the project was 26.8%, and did not differ by sex, but by age (35.6% in age group ≥ 80, 29.3% in age group 75-79, 23.2% in age group 70-74) and country, with the highest prevalence in Portugal (34.5%) and the lowest in France (24.4%). Occurrences of iron deficiency were observed with incidence rate (IR) per 100 person-years of 9.2 and did not significantly differ by sex or age group. The highest IR per 100 person-years was observed in Austria (20.8), the lowest in Germany (6.1). Iron deficiency is frequent among relatively healthy European older adults, with people aged ≥ 80 years and residence in Austria and Portugal associated with the highest risk.

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Iron Deficiency and Incident Infections

Iron deficiency is associated with negative health outcomes in older adults. Therefore, we investigated whether iron deficiency, with or without anemia, is associated with incident infections over 3 years in DO-HEALTH participants. Across all participants included in the analyses, iron deficiency at the beginning of the study was not associated with incident overall infections, but was associated with a 63% greater rate of incident severe infections requiring hospitalization. This association was more pronounced among the participants who did not have anemia at the beginning of the study.

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Association between iron deficiency and hospitalization rate

Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with negative health outcomes in older adults. Therefore, we explored whether ID is associated with the number of hospitalizations and with at least one length of hospital stay (LOS) ≥5 day in DO-HEALTH participants. Overall, ID at the beginning of the study was associated with a 24% increased incidence rate of hospitalization over 3 years. This association was independent of anemia status at the beginning of the study since the interaction between ID and anemia at baseline was not significant. Moreover, ID was not significantly associated with having a LOS ≥5 days among participants with at least one hospitalization over 3 years. Efforts to minimize ID in older adults may improve overall health and optimize healthcare costs.

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Iron deficiency and biomarkers of inflammation

We investigated in DO-HEALTH participants whether iron deficiency at the beginning of the project and at any yearly follow-up time point, with or without anemia, was associated with changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels over 3 years. In all participants included in the analyses, iron deficiency at the beginning of the project was associated with greater increase in IL-6 levels over 3 years. Iron deficiency at any yearly time point was associated with higher increases in hs-CRP and IL-6 levels over 3 years. No significant interaction between iron deficiency and anemia was found, suggesting that the results are independent of the anemic status. These findings suggest that iron deficiency may play a role in low-grade chronic inflammation among relatively healthy older adults.

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POLYPHARMACY, MULTIMORBIDITY STUDIES

Prevalence of polypharmacy

We investigated the prevalence of polypharmacy, defined as the concomitant use of five or more medications, excluding vitamins or dietary supplements, and the characteristics associated with polypharmacy in DO-HEALTH participants. 7.2% of participants reported polypharmacy ranging from 16.4% in Geneva to 60.8% in Coimbra. Older age, greater BMI and increased number of comorbidities were associated with polypharmacy. Women were less likely to report polypharmacy than men. In comparison to participants from Zurich, participants from Coimbra were more likely to report polypharmacy, while participants from Geneva or Toulouse were less likely to report polypharmacy. Living situation, smoking status, years of education, prior fall, cognitive function, self-rated health and frailty status were not significantly associated with polypharmacy.

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Association Between Multimorbidity and Rate of Falls

We examined the association between the baseline number of chronic diseases and multimorbidity with regard to the incidence of all and injurious falls over 3 years in DO-HEALTH participants. Among the participants included in the analysis, 26.4% had multimorbidity at the beginning of the project. Overall, each 1-unit increase in the number of chronic diseases at the beginning of the project was linearly associated with a 7% increased incidence rate of all falls and a 6% increased incidence rate of injurious falls. Multimorbidity at the beginning of the project was associated with a 21% increased incidence rate of all falls and a 17% increased incidence rate of injurious falls. These findings support that multimorbidity may need consideration as a risk factor for falls, even in generally healthy and active older adults.

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DYNAMICS OF AGEING

Aging Trajectories

Ageing trajectories range from delayed ageing with extended health to accelerated ageing, with an increased risk of frailty. We evaluated the prevalence and prospective change between health states in DO-HEALTH. Among the participants included in the analyses, 23.1% were initially healthy agers (HA, Nurses’ Health Study healthy ageing criteria), 44.4% were non-HA but not pre-frail (Fried frailty criteria), and 32.6% were pre-frail or frail. Subsequently, 65.3% remained in the same health state, 12.0% improved to a healthier state, and 22.8% progressed to a less advantageous state. After adjusting for sex, study centre, treatment, and body mass index, each year of age was associated with 6% lower odds of improving health states. Women had 35% higher odds than men of following a disadvantageous trajectory. We observed dynamic trajectories of ageing where transitioning to a healthier state became less likely with advancing age and among women.

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Prevalence of healthy aging

We compared the prevalence of healthy aging in DO-HEALTH participants. Among the participants included in the analyses, 41.8% of DO-HEALTH participants were healthy agers (Nurses’ Health Study healthy ageing criteria) with significant variability by country: Austria (Innsbruck) 58.3%, Switzerland (Zurich, Basel, Geneva) 51.2%, Germany (Berlin) 37.6%, France (Toulouse) 36.7% and Portugal (Coimbra) 8.8%. Differences in prevalence by country persisted after adjustment for age. In the multivariate model, younger age, female gender, lower BMI, faster gait speed and faster performance in sit-to-stand test were independently and significantly associated with HA. Despite the same inclusion and exclusion criteria preselecting relatively healthy adults age 70 years and older, HA prevalence in DO-HEALTH varied significantly between countries and was highest in participants from Austria and Switzerland, lowest in participants from Portugal. Independent of country, younger age, female gender, lower BMI and better physical function were associated with HA.

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FRAILTY / SARCOPENIA / INSTRUMENTS STUDIES

Prevalence of Physical Frailty

Frailty is a geriatric syndrome associated with multiple negative health outcomes. However, its prevalence varies by population and instrument used. We investigated frailty and pre-frailty prevalence by 5 instruments in DO-HEALTH participants. Among relatively healthy adults age 70 and older enrolled to DO-HEALTH, prevalence of frailty and pre-frailty differed significantly by instrument, country, gender, and age. Among instruments, the highest prevalence of frailty and pre-frailty was documented by the SHARE-Frailty Instrument (7.0% / 43.7%) and the lowest by the SOF-Frailty Index (1.0% / 25.9%). Frailty associated factors were residing in Coimbra (Portugal), age above 75 years, and female gender. The same three factors predicted pre-frailty.

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Comparing Prevalence of Sarcopenia Using Twelve Sarcopenia Definitions

Multinational prevalence data on sarcopenia among generally healthy older adults is limited. Therefore, we assessed the prevalence of sarcopenia in DO-HEALTH participants based on twelve current sarcopenia definitions. Overall, most sarcopenia definitions, including Delmonico (16.8%), Baumgartner (12.8%), FNIH1(10.5%), IWGS (3.6%), EWGSOP1 (3.4%), SDOC (2.0%), Morley (1.3%), and AWGS1 (1.1%) tended to be higher than the prevalence based on EWGSOP2 (0.7%). In contrast, the definitions AWGS2 (0.7%), EWGSOP2-LE (1.1%), FNIH2 (1.0%) – all based on muscle mass and muscle strength – showed similar lower prevalence as EWGSOP2 (0.7%). Moreover, most sarcopenia definitions did not overlap on identifying sarcopenia on an individual participant-level. We found major discordances of sarcopenia prevalence both on a population- and on a participant- level between various sarcopenia definitions. Our findings suggest that the concept of sarcopenia may need to be rethought to reliably and validly identify people with impaired muscle health.

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Grip strength cut points

Reference values of grip strength (GS) for Swiss older adults are missing. We therefore aimed to derive sex- and age-specific GS cut-points using the Martin Vigorimeter in DO-HEALTH Swiss population. Additionally, we aimed to identify clinically relevant weakness and assess convergent validity with key markers of physical function and sarcopenia in generally healthy Swiss older adults. In generally healthy Swiss older adults, weakness defined by the median or the upper limit of the 1st GS quintile may serve as reference to identify clinically relevant weakness. Additional research is needed in less healthy populations in order to derive representative population-based cut-points.

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MUSCULOSKELETAL HEALTH

Effects of VitD Suppl. on Musculoskeletal Health

Previous clinical trials and systematic reviews on the effects of supplemental vitamin D on musculoskeletal outcomes are conflicting. In this paper, we review the literature and summarize the effects of a high daily dose of 2 000 IU vitamin D on musculoskeletal outcomes in generally healthy adults of US VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) and DO-HEALTH. These studies found no benefit of 2 000 IU/d of supplemental vitamin D on nonvertebral fractures, falls, functional decline, or frailty. In VITAL, supplementation with 2 000 IU/d of vitamin D did not reduce the risk of total or hip fractures. In a subcohort of VITAL, supplemental vitamin D did not improve bone density or structure or physical performance measures. In DO-HEALTH, the combined treatments (vitamin D with omega-3 and a simple home exercise program) showed a significant 39% decreased odds of becoming prefrail compared to the control. In generally healthy and vitamin D-replete older adults not preselected for vitamin D deficiency or low bone mass or osteoporosis, 2 000 IU/d of vitamin D had no musculoskeletal health benefits. These findings may not apply to individuals with very low 25(OH)D levels, gastrointestinal disorders causing malabsorption, or those with osteoporosis.

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Publications

Below you find the publications published using DO-HEALT data. Because of copyright rules, not all of them can be downloaded, and we are not allowed to send you copies of these articles. However, your local medical library may have access to them. Publications with PMID/PMC numbers are freely available on the PubMed/Pubmed Central website within 6 to 12 months after the date of publication.

AuthorsTitleJournalDOI, PMID, etc.Abstract / Download
2024Roman Sager, Stephanie Gaengler, Walter C. Willett, E. John Orav, Michele Mattle, Jana Habermann, Katharina Geiling, Ralph C. Schimmer, Bruno Vellas, Reto W. Kressig, Andreas Egli, Bess Dawson-Hughes, Heike A. Bischoff-FerrariAdherence to the MIND diet and the odds of mild cognitive impairment in
generally healthy older adults: The 3-year DO-HEALTH study
J Nutr Health Aging
2024 Mar;28(3):100034
doi: 10.1016/j.jnha.2023.100034GoTo PubMed

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2024Gaengler S, Sadlon A, De Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Willett WC, Manson JE, Vellas B, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Von Eckardstein A, Ruschitzka F, Rizzoli R, da Silva JAP, Kressig RW, Kanis J, Orav EJ, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HAEffects of vitamin D, omega-3 and a simple strength exercise programme in cardiovascular disease prevention: The DO-HEALTH randomized controlled trial.J Nutr Health Aging. 2024 Jan 9:100037doi: 10.1016/j.jnha.2024.100037.
PMID: 38199870
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2023Meryl S. LeBoff, Heike A. Bischoff-FerrariThe Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on
Musculoskeletal Health: The VITAL and DO-Health Trials
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci
2023 Jun 16;78(Supplement_1):73-78
doi: 10.1093/gerona/glad073
PMID: 37325962
PMCID: PMC10272981
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2023Michael Gagesch, Maud Wieczorek, Lauren A. Abderhalden, Wei Lang, Gregor Freystaetter, Gabriele Armbrecht, Reto W. Kressig, Bruno Vellas, René Rizzoli, Michael Blauth, E. John Orav, Andreas Egli and Heike A. Bischoff‑FerrariGrip strength cut-points from the Swiss DO-HEALTH populationEur Rev Aging Phys Act
2023 Aug 5;20(1):13
doi: 10.1186/s11556-023-00323-6
PMID: 37543639
PMCID: PMC10403936
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2023Stuck AK, Tsai LT, Freystaetter G, Vellas B, Kanis JA, Rizzoli R, Kressig KS, Armbrecht G, Da Silva JAP, Dawson-Hughes B, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HAComparing Prevalence of Sarcopenia Using Twelve Sarcopenia Definitions in a Large Multinational European Population of Community-Dwelling Older AdultsJ Nutr Health Aging
2023;27(3):205-212
doi: 10.1007/s12603-023-1888-y
PMID: 36973929
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2023de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Woll L, Wieczorek M, Abderhalden LA, Lanz P, Schaer DJ, Spahn DR, Orav EJ, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH Research GroupAssociation between iron deficiency and hospitalization rate in community-dwelling older adults: A 3-year prospective observational study of DO-HEALTHAm J Clin Nutr
2023 Jan;117(1):12-21
doi: 10.1016/j.ajcnut.2022.11.001
Epub 2022 Dec 15
PMID: 36789930
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2023Huberty S, Freystätter G, Wieczorek M, Dawson-Hughes B, Kanis JA, Rizzoli R, Kressig RW, Vellas B, Da Silva JAP, Armbrecht G, Theiler R, Egli A, Orav EJ, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH Research GroupAssociation Between Multimorbidity and Rate of Falls: A 3-Year 5-Country Prospective Study in Generally Healthy and Active Community-Dwelling Adults Aged ≥70 YearsJ Am Med Dir Assoc
2023 Jan 17:S1525-8610(22)00971-9
doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2022.12.011
Epub ahead of print
PMID: 36657487
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2023Gagesch M, Wieczorek M, Vellas B, Kressig RW, Rizzoli R, Kanis J, Willett WC, Egli A, Lang W, Orav EJ, Bischoff-Ferrari HAEffects of Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids and a Home Exercise Program on Prevention of Pre-Frailty in Older Adults: The DO-HEALTH Randomized Clinical TrialJ Frailty Aging
2023;12(1):71-77
doi: 10.14283/jfa.2022.48
PMID: 36629088
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2022Gängler S, Steiner H, Gagesch M, Guyonnet S, Orav EJ, von Eckardstein A, Willett WC, Bischoff-Ferrari HAAdherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Incidence of Pre-Frailty and Frailty in Community-Dwelling Adults 70+: The 3-Year DO-HEALTH StudyNutrients
2022 Oct 6;14(19):4145
doi: 10.3390/nu14194145
PMID: 36235797
PMCID: PMC9573135
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2022Lanz P, Wieczorek M, Sadlon A, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Abderhalden LA, Schaer DJ, Spahn DR, Freystätter G, Orav EJ, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HAIron Deficiency and Incident Infections among Community-Dwelling Adults Age 70 Years and Older: Results from the DO-HEALTH StudyJ Nutr Health Aging
2022;26(9):864-871
doi: 10.1007/s12603-022-1836-2
PMID: 36156678
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2022Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Manson JE, Dawson-Hughes B, Manz MG, Theiler R, Braendle K, Vellas B, Rizzoli R, Kressig RW, Staehelin HB, Da Silva JAP, Armbrecht G, Egli A, Kanis JA, Orav EJ, Gaengler SCombined Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and a Simple Home Exercise Program May Reduce Cancer Risk Among Active Adults Aged 70 and Older: A Randomized Clinical TrialFront Aging
2022 Apr 25;3:852643
doi: 10.3389/fragi.2022.852643
PMID: 35821820
PMCID: PMC9261319
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2022Mattle M, Meyer U, Lang W, Mantegazza N, Gagesch M, Mansky R, Kressig RW, Egli A, Orav EJ, Bischoff-Ferrari HAPrevalence of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns in Generally Healthy European Adults Aged 70 Years and Older-Baseline Results From the DO-HEALTH Clinical TrialFront Public Health
2022 Apr 14;10:810725
doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.810725
PMID: 35493350
PMCID: PMC9046658
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2022de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Sadlon A, Theiler R, Orav JE, Vellas B, Rizzoli R, Kressig RW, Kanis JA, Guyonnet S, Lang W, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH Research GroupPrevalence of polypharmacy in community-dwelling older adults from seven centres in five European countries: a cross-sectional study of DO-HEALTHBMJ Open
2022 Apr 29;12(4):e051881
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051881
PMID: 35487733
PMCID: PMC9058693
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2022Ghisla V, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Orav EJ, Abderhalden LA, Sadlon A, Egli A, Krützfeldt J, Kanis JA, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH research groupProspective Study of Ageing Trajectories in the European DO-HEALTH StudyGerontology
2023;69(1):57-64
doi: 10.1159/000523923
Epub 2022 Apr 20
PMID: 35443250
PMCID: PMC9148895
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2022Stahl-Gugger A, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Wieczorek M, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Abderhalden LA, Schaer DJ, Spahn DR, Orav EJ, Vellas B, da Silva JAP, Kressig RW, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH Research GroupPrevalence and incidence of iron deficiency in European community-dwelling older adults: an observational analysis of the DO-HEALTH trialAging Clin Exp Res
2022 Sep;34(9):2205-2215
doi: 10.1007/s40520-022-02093-0
Epub 2022 Mar 18
PMID: 35304704
PMCID: PMC9464157
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2022Schietzel S, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Sadlon A, Gagesch M, Willett WC, Orav EJ, Kressig RW, Vellas B, Rizzoli R, da Silva JAP, Blauth M, Kanis JA, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HAPrevalence of healthy aging among community dwelling adults age 70 and older from five European countriesBMC Geriatr
2022 Mar 2;22(1):174
doi: 10.1186/s12877-022-02755-8
PMID: 35236290
PMCID: PMC8889763
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2022Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Freystätter G, Vellas B, Dawson-Hughes B, Kressig RW, Kanis JA, Willett WC, Manson JE, Rizzoli R, Theiler R, Hofbauer LC, Armbrecht G, da Silva JAP, Blauth M, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Lang W, Siebert U, Egli A, Orav EJ, Wieczorek M; DO-HEALTH Research GroupEffects of vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, and a simple home strength exercise program on fall prevention: the DO-HEALTH randomized clinical trialAm J Clin Nutr
2022 May 1;115(5):1311-1321
doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqac022
PMID: 35136915
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2022Gagesch M, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Abderhalden LA, Freystaetter G, Sadlon A, Kanis JA, Kressig RW, Guyonnet S, DaSilva JAP, Felsenberg D, Rizzoli R, Blauth M, Orav EJ, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HAPrevalence of Physical Frailty: Results from the DO-HEALTH StudyJ Frailty Aging
2022;11(1):18-25
doi: 10.14283/jfa.2021.18
PMID: 35122086
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2021Wieczorek M, Schwarz F, Sadlon A, Abderhalden LA, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Spahn DR, Schaer DJ, Orav EJ, Egli A, Bischoff-Ferrari HA; DO-HEALTH Research groupIron deficiency and biomarkers of inflammation: a 3-year prospective analysis of the DO-HEALTH trialAging Clin Exp Res
2022 Mar;34(3):515-525
doi: 10.1007/s40520-021-01955-3
Epub 2021 Sep 17
PMID: 34533774
PMCID: PMC8894209
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2020Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Vellas B, Rizzoli R, Kressig RW, da Silva JAP, Blauth M, Felson DT, McCloskey EV, Watzl B, Hofbauer LC, Felsenberg D, Willett WC, Dawson-Hughes B, Manson JE, Siebert U, Theiler R, Staehelin HB, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Abderhalden LA, Egli A, Kanis JA, Orav EJ; DO-HEALTH Research GroupEffect of Vitamin D Supplementation, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation, or a Strength-Training Exercise Program on Clinical Outcomes in Older Adults: The DO-HEALTH Randomized Clinical TrialJAMA
2020 Nov 10;324(18):1855-1868
doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.16909
PMID: 33170239
PMCID: PMC7656284
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2020Bischoff-Ferrari HA, de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino C, Rival S, Vellas B, Rizzoli R, Kressig RW, Kanis JA, Manson JE, Dawson-Hughes B, Orav EJ, da Silva JAP, Blauth M, Felsenberg D, Ferrari SM, Theiler R, Egli A; DO-HEALTH Research GroupDO-HEALTH: Vitamin D3 - Omega-3 - Home exercise - Healthy aging and longevity trial - Design of a multinational clinical trial on healthy aging among European seniorsContemp Clin Trials
2021 Jan;100:106124
doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2020.106124
Epub 2020 Aug 26
PMID: 32858228
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2019Chocano-Bedoya PO, Vellas B, Kressig RW, Orav EJ, Willett W, Bischoff-Ferrari HAINFLAMMATORY DIET PATTERN AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN 5 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES OVER 3-YEARS FOLLOW-UPInnov Aging
2019 Nov 8;3(Suppl 1):S917
doi: 10.1093/geroni/igz038.3343
PMCID: PMC6846121
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